emanicaption discussion

S. Civil War was not about preserving slavery, but was instead about preserving state’s rights. This group is by no means limited to the South. Indeed, if you go to rural portions of northern states like New York and Ohio or in border states like Maryland, it is not too hard to find people waving the old Bars [supanova_question]

1 Kimmel Jimmy Kimmel Professor Cochran ENGL 1302 – 4211 24 November

1

Kimmel

Jimmy Kimmel

Professor Cochran

ENGL 1302 – 4211

24 November 2020

The Integration and Acceptance of Emotional Support Animals in Society

Topic/Issue: Emotional support animals need to be represented accurately in society and treated as real service animals.

Thesis Statement:

Emotional support animals (ESAs) have been controversial because while they may provide comfort for their owners, they generally have no specific training requirements or status under the Americans With Disabilities Act. In order to accurately represent emotional support animals and cement their role in society as a special kind of support animal, the government should create a reputable training system along with specific guidelines to establish a place for special classifications of emotional support animals like they already do for service animals, improving the tarnished reputation of emotional support animals forever.

Aratani, Lori. “Department of Transportation proposes ban on emotional support animals on planes.” Washington Post, 22 Jan. 2020, p. NA. Gale In Context: Science, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A611986063/SCIC?u=nhmccd_main&sid=SCIC&xid=71ab2340. Accessed 24 Oct. 2020.

In her article, “Department of Transportation proposes ban on emotional support animals on planes”, Lori Aratani argues that everything about the Department of Transportation’s proposed rules are tolerable, but it is unclear as to whether or not emotional support animals other than dogs are allowed. Aratani admits that Transportation Department officials are willing to accept emotional support animals like cats, pigs, and rabbits and other animals that are able to be trained to provide service to their owners. However, this acceptance is in the hands of the public, and it is up to the people to decide what types of animals should be allowed to board airplanes.

This source seems reliable and trustworthy. Lori Aratani writes about transportation issues for The Washington Post. Her research includes airlines and airports and the agencies that oversee them. She also writes about innovation in the transportation sector and how new technology is changing the way people get to where they’re going. Aratani’s main research focus is on transportation issues, including airports, airlines, and the nation’s railroad and subway systems. Her evidence she uses is largely interviews with different types of airport organizations and their points of view. Aratani’s rhetoric includes logos and pathos and she relies mostly on logic and reasoning. Through her interviews with people, she brings in the more emotional side of rhetoric (pathos), to find out why the Department of Transportation feels like they should ban certain species of emotional support animals solely based on their species. In comparison to other authors, she does not primarily deal with emotional support animals in her other works, and this makes her a unique source in my research.

This source is important for my research because it shows what type of animal airlines will allow on the flight as an ESA. The article also shows what flight attendants think of the policy and exemplifies why they think that this policy is not a good idea for the safety and health of the flight attendants and the rest of the crew members. It also shows that the Department of Transportation will allow psychiatric service animals on the flight, and that they are included in the policy. The DOT sees depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as real disorders and disabilities and has come to understand that people diagnosed with these disorders may require a service animal. This source will contribute to my research questions by presenting more guidelines about the requirements for emotional support animals to be able to travel with their owners. This information is vital to my research because the article clearly states that airlines are not required to accommodate for animals like rabbits, pigs and cats because of how unusual they are in the field of an ESA. However, the article does say that the airlines’ definition of a service animal is typically dogs that have been specially trained to help complete tasks for their caretakers with disabilities. It gives the impression that maybe the guidelines will have to be expanded even more in order for the airline to be able to accommodate for ESAs that are not dogs.

Word Count: 519

Barger, Theresa Sullivan. “ADA compliance across the campus: providing accommodations to level the playing field for students with both visible and invisible disabilities.” University Business, vol. 19, no. 7, July 2016, p. 41+. Gale OneFile: Health and Medicine, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A456900736/HRCA?u=nhmccd_main&sid=HRCA&xid=a9b1f979. Accessed 25 Oct. 2020.

In her article, “ADA compliance across the campus: providing accommodations to level the playing field for students with both visible and invisible disabilities”, Theresa Sullivan Barger argues that public schools should be willing to provide accurate accommodations for students diagnosed with invisible disabilities. These disabilities range from anxiety to serious mental disorders and are classified into two classifications: emotional and physical. Barger admits that while some of the disabilities mentioned on the spectrum may seem unworthy of accommodations, providing accommodations for a student with invisible disabilities may help them have a successful future. Barger also notes that there may be quite a few students who are allergic to cats and dogs and schools should consider this before allowing emotional support animals on campus.

Theresa Sullivan Barger is an award-winning journalist and a versatile writer and a thorough reporter. Her writing is clear and at the same time captivating. Barger mainly uses interviews as her main source of evidence, and she captures the pathos and logos forms of rhetoric through her interview with a blind student at Michigan State who received the assistance she needed and got a job working with Apple to make their products accessible to others with her condition. Other authors that I have analyzed only provide a glimpse at these invisible disabilities, and Barger provided a good explanation about why people with invisible disabilities need extra help in school.

This source will contribute to the development of my research question because has information regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act. It also recognizes all of the invisible disabilities most people do not even think about like anxiety, PTSD, and depression, to name a few, and explains that they are real, psychological disabilities and disorders. It also provides vital information on how school systems adapt to a student who has an invisible disability like environmental allergies, which may contribute to my research since the typical emotional support animal is a dog or a cat. This source might be helpful to students who are interested in invisible disabilities and those who are diagnosed with invisible disabilities of their own, since

Barger provides a detailed description of what universities like Michigan State have done to accommodate students with invisible disabilities.

Word Count: 349

Bever, Lindsey. “Woman brings ’emotional support’ squirrel on plane. That doesn’t fly with Frontier.” Washington Post, 10 Oct. 2018. Gale In Context: Science, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A557625564/SCIC?u=nhmccd_main&sid=SCIC&xid=f96b1664. Accessed 31 Oct. 2020.

In her article “Department of Transportation proposes ban on emotional support animals on planes”, Lindsey Bever argues that the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Air Carrier Act of 1986 contradict each other and that it was not entirely the passenger’s fault that she brought an unlicensed squirrel on board, simply because the government’s guidelines regarding emotional support animals were not clear. The Americans With Disabilities Act says that service animals can be either specially trained dogs or horses, yet airlines are more likely to be familiar with the Air Carrier Act of 1984, which maintains the idea that “free travel” should be allowed for any animal that is providing assistance to their mentally or physically disabled owners.

Lindsey Bever covers general assignment news for The Washington Post. Bever is affiliated with the organization, Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Association of Health Care Journalists. She uses logos to describe the two main guidelines that discuss emotional support animals, the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Air Carrier Act of 1986. Bever uses pathos to capture the rage of the other passengers who were forced to deplane because of a woman who brought a squirrel on board, claiming that it was a licensed emotional support animal. Her main types of evidence she uses are videos from passengers who witnessed the squirrel and were enraged when they had to deplane and reports from other news anchors who wrote about the squirrel, like Karin Brulliard, who studies animals and people and how their lives intersect. Unlike Brulliard, Bever does not cover the medical parts of emotional support animals and instead focuses on reports and social media.

This source is important to my research because it further establishes the status quo by mentioning that people were clapping and cheering when they saw “a woman… in a wheelchair being escorted through the airport” (pp. 4), which supports the idea that people are more comfortable with a wheelchair being used as an accommodation for someone with a physical disability than they are with a person needing an emotional support animal for a mental disability that might not be noticeable to the average person. The article also gives the impression that the current guidelines established by the government might need clarification and more strict rules when it comes to the rights of emotional support animals. This article could be beneficial to anyone seeking further confirmation of the status quo regarding the rights of emotional support animals and those who are interested will find this article to be not only trustworthy, but also relatable since it connects with readers who are part of the information age and crave technology, since it cites eyewitness accounts using social media cites like Twitter and Facebook.

Word Count: 432

Burch, Kaitlin, et al. “FSU Allows Furry Friends for Emotional Support.” The Gatepost, 18 Oct. 2019, fsugatepost.com/2019/10/18/fsu-allows-furry-friends-for-emotional-support/. Accessed 18 October 2020.

In their article “FSU Allows Furry Friends for Emotional Support”, Kaitlin Burch and her colleagues argue that emotional support animals deserve to be accurately represented in universities like Florida State University (FSU) where emotional support animals are required to have documentation, like the animal’s health records and a note from a licensed medical health professional claiming that the student has a diagnosed mental disability, and service animals do not require documentation at all. In addition to this, service dogs are allowed everywhere on campus, but emotional support animals must remain in the dorms at all times, except when they need to relieve themselves. Burch admits that many students are all for allowing emotional support animals on campus, but some students may have allergies to pet dander, making it impossible for FSU to allow emotional support animals full access to the entire campus. For over eighty-five years, The Gatepost has been dedicated to delivering credible and timely news to students, staff, faculty, and administrators alike. The Gatepost believes that journalism alone ensures that the students at Florida State University (FSU) are heard and their opinions are accounted for. Burch is credited as one of the writers for FSU’s The Gatepost. Burch’s main sources include reports from the FSU’s faculty and staff members. She also consults the Student Handbook as it relates to emotional support animals. Buch also uses the logos and pathos forms of rhetoric when she interviews FSU’s Associate Dean of Academic Success LaDonna Bridges to get her opinion on the difference between emotional support animals and service animals.

This source is important for my research because it shows the rules a university such as FSU has to follow in order to allow students and perhaps teachers to bring an emotional support animal and a security dog on campus. It also discusses the procedures the individual must go through to prove that their animal is an emotional support animal. According to the article, the individual will be asked questions regarding what the animal assists the owner with and whether or not the student in question has a diagnosed disability. In addition to this, they will be asked to provide the school with a doctor’s note that is specifically from a health care provider, as a primary doctor does not have the qualifications that are necessary to fill out a form for a person to bring an emotional support animal on campus. Other authors touch upon the subject of emotional support animals attending universities, but they never discuss the topic in detail, as Burch does. This article also highlights the difference between an emotional support animal and a security animal by giving the definition of each one and will be helpful to people who attend a university and need an emotional support animal with them on campus and who may require an exact definition of both types of animals from a university’s perspective.

Word Count: 475

“Federal Government May Tighten Restrictions On Service Animals On Planes.” Morning Edition, 23 Jan. 2020, p. NA. Gale In Context: Science, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A612422342/SCIC?u=nhmccd_main&sid=SCIC&xid=bed056fd. Accessed 15 Oct. 2020.

In their interview “Federal Government May Tighten Restrictions On Service Animals On Planes”, Merritt Kennedy and David Greene bring up that there has been a rise in passengers use of emotional support animals in the past five years. Kennedy and Greene admit that there are some flaws that come with the change in the Department of Transportation’s rules for bringing emotional support animals on the airplane. The new system requires the passengers to fill out multiple forms just for the service animal to be able to board the plane. These forms include verification of health and training. In addition to this, the airline will also need a form requiring that the animal will not relieve themselves while in the cabin of the plane. This is potentially a ton of extra paperwork just to bring an emotional support animal on the flight.

This source seems to be accurate, reliable and thorough because it includes credible information relating to the Department of Transportation and the Association of Flight Attendants. The byline was Merrit Kennedy and she is a reporter for NPR’s News Desk. Kennedy covers a broad range of issues, from the latest developments out of the Middle East to science research news. The authors mainly use interview as their form of evidence. Their rhetoric includes the use of ethos since the interview focuses mainly on Merrit Kennedy’s opinion and the reader can get a glimpse of her personality through her speech. This type of rhetoric was effective, as it provided a ton of evidence that suggested that the government needed to have more clear guidelines for airports regarding emotional support animals. Kennedy included the opinion of Taylor Garland, a spokesperson for the Association of Flight Attendants, making her information much more credible and fact-based, rather than the interview being composed entirely of her own opinion.

This source is important for my research because it shows just how many people abuse the privilege of traveling with their supposed emotional support animals (ESAs) in an airplane. The interview also sheds some light on the Department of Transportation and how they are trying to add in some sort of guidelines for ESAs, so that people are less likely to abuse the system. The federal government is shown to be actively participating in reducing the chance of people traveling with so-called emotional support animals and lying about their “disability.” While depression and anxiety are considered to be real psychological disorders that may require an ESA to treat them, this interview begs the question, how far is too far when it comes to ESAs and their rights.

This source will actively contribute to my research problem statement because it shows how the passengers who do not require ESAs find it bothersome that they are even allowed on airplanes at all. There is actually a particular part of the interview where Taylor Garland, a spokesperson for the Association of Flight Attendants, states that they have seen an increase in ESAs being brought by passengers aboard the airplane in the last five years. This organization also claims that people who do not actually need the emotional support animals during the flight or those who do not even have a diagnosed psychological disorder are abusing the privilege. This source will be useful to people who want credible information regarding the rights of emotional support animals (ESAs) and permission for them to board airplanes. It also provides information on the fact that the government needs to have more specific guidelines and that the airlines need to be more cautious if they suspect someone is misusing the privilege.

Word Count 588

Haefelin, Norina, et al. “Anxiety Reduction in College Students after Brief Interaction with a Therapy Dog or Animatronic Dog.” North American Journal of Psychology, vol. 22, no. 3, 2020, p. 411. Gale OneFile: Health and Medicine, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A637227331/HRCA?u=nhmccd_main&sid=HRCA&xid=91d10c67. Accessed 14 Oct. 2020.

In their article “Anxiety Reduction in College Students after Brief Interaction with a Therapy Dog or Animatronic Dog”, Haefelin and her colleagues argue that while it may seem like animatronic dogs provide more comfort than real dogs would, mechanical dogs lack companionship, a genuine quality that could be the true difference between real dogs and animatronics. Haefelin and her colleagues admit that it may seem like mechanical dogs would be a major hit with the younger generation because the youth today seems to be addicted to technology. However, the innate bond between humans and dogs simply cannot be replicated with cold, metallic machines.

This source seems really thorough, reliable and trustworthy because it uses complex terminology and found realistic answers to thorough scientific experiments. It is also easy to comprehend, making it a perfect resource for my research. The article is also well organized, making it easier to find information relating to a topic. Norina Haefelin is a master’s student in the Counselor Education department at Penn State University. Her emphasis is in Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling. Haefelin is passionate about working with adults with disabilities, adults with mental health concerns, and neurofeedback. Her main evidence she uses are results of multiple social experiments conducted by other researchers on the effects of mechanical dogs in comparison with real dogs in the field of animal assisted therapy. Norina Haefelin seems to use both logos and pathos forms of rhetoric, since she is describing the resulting data from the experiments along with students’ emotional reactions. Unlike the other authors I analyzed, Haefelin proved that therapeutic dogs significantly reduce anxiety and stress in college students using science.

This source will contribute to the development of my research question because it provides options for people who are allergic to dogs and cannot participate in animal assisted activities that include therapy dogs. These suggestions include mechanical dogs and dog videos, and studies have proven the mechanical dog as less effective at reducing stress and anxiety, proving that there really is no replacement for a real dog and even just watching a real dog in action is enough to reduce stress and anxiety. This information can really help me to develop a paper that includes people with allergies to certain types of therapeutic animals like dogs, so that nobody is excluded in my research. This source will be helpful to others who are researching this topic because it introduces the idea of replacing real dogs with animatronics and dog videos and it shows that nothing can replace a real dog, no matter how advanced the technology is.

Word Count: 418

Hart, Lynette A., et al. “Service or Assistance Dogs and Other Working Dogs – Special Subjects.” Merck Veterinary Manual, Merck Veterinary Manual, Nov. 2014, www.merckvetmanual.com/special-subjects/the-human-animal-bond/service-or-assistance-dogs-and-other-working-dogs. Accessed 18 October 2020.

In their article, “Service or Assistance Dogs and Other Working Dogs – Special Subjects”, Lynette A. Hart and Mariko Yamamoto argue that there is a flaw in the way emotional support animals (ESAs) are accepted into the title of a working dog and that this is due to the fact that ESAs, comparably to service animals, do not have the same level of access to all public places probably because they are not respected as well as a service animal. Hart and Yamamoto both admit that while emotional support dogs may not be viewed as actual service dogs, these dogs can assist people with various types of disabilities ranging from being able to detect a seizure, helping someone struggling with depression and calming a child with autism. These can be viewed as important in the eyes of the dogs’ caregivers.

This source seems reliable and trustworthy. Lynette A. Hart is a full Professor at UC Davis and the Director of UC Center for Animal Alternatives, Department of Population Health and Reproduction. Her primary focus on research is on the topic of human-animal interactions. In contrast to the other authors whose works I have analyzed, Hart seems to only rely on her own opinion based on her research, as no other articles were cited in her work. Although her credentials and rank in the field of emotional support animals is high, I believe that Hart should be willing to provide the opinions of other articles instead of just her own and, I believe that this process will make their paper seem more trustworthy. Hart also primarily uses ethos and logos rhetoric to explain the strength of the bond that occurs between the emotional support animal and their owner.

This source is important for my research because it describes how an ESA does not need special training and is able to innately provide support for their owners. Since they lack the special training needed to become a service dog, it is easy to see why many people think that ESAs are not real service animals and are viewed as mere pets in society. This source will contribute to the development of my research question because it begs the question of how an individual is able to cope without their service animal if they become sick or hurt in a way that affects the individual’s daily routine. It also provides information regarding the training of a service dog in comparison to the lack of training of an ESA, which may also benefit my research paper. It also provides the guidelines regarding how an ESA is accepted into a public place, like hotels and transportation vehicles like buses. The article also describes the veterinarian’s potential role in choosing an ESA or a service dog that will best suit the needs of both the individual and the dog. This includes the type of training the dog will undergo, certain medical procedures the dog will require, and the ideal breed type that the individual may need based on their disability or even age. This article will be beneficial to others who are researching this topic since Hart’s research is solely focused on human-animal interactions.

Word Count: 527

Kunkle, Fredrick. “Spirit becomes latest airline to impose stricter rules on emotional support animals.” Washington Post, 4 Oct. 2018. Gale In Context: Science, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A556891637/SCIC?u=nhmccd_main&sid=SCIC&xid=60984cec. Accessed 24 Oct. 2020.

In his article “Spirit becomes latest airline to impose stricter rules on emotional support animals”, Fredrick Kunkle argues that more airlines should provide better guidelines and restrictions on emotional support animals, specifically their acceptance in the cabins of airplanes. Kunkle admits that these new rules may seem like a ton of paperwork to the average passenger, but they are meant to prevent people from abusing the privilege to bring their so-called emotional support animals onboard the airplane. These documents include a note from a licensed mental health professional, a form certifying that the animal is healthy, and a form showing that the passenger understands that they are responsible if the animal misbehaves while in flight. Under the old rules proposed by Spirit Airlines, people could bring their emotional support animals (ESAs) if they had a medical document as proof that a licensed medical professional approved of them needing an ESA. This brings up the idea that perhaps some, if not all of the medical documents must have been forged, and therefore, new rules had to be established.

Kunkle has covered politics, courts, police, transportation and local government in Maryland and Virginia. He has worked for Reuters, Dow Jones, the Bergen Record and the Newark Star-Ledger as a general assignment reporter and a beat reporter covering aging, business, police, courts, local government and politics. Kunkle uses the logos form of rhetoric when he goes into detail about the three main forms that passengers need to fill out, explaining what each form requires. Other authors I have analyzed show the passengers’ reaction to the changes in airlines allowing ESAs, but Kunkle never shows any sign of emotion throughout his article.

This source is important to my research because it goes into further detail about the forms the passengers are required to fill out if they want to travel with an emotional support animal (ESA). It also provides information regarding a situation in which the passenger is unable to keep their animal under control. If a passenger is unable to keep their ESA under control during the flight, or even prior to the flight, they will be asked to leave the airplane or “miss” their flight. This source will play a vital role in my research paper since it shows what the regulations are for bringing an ESA onboard an airplane. The article might be beneficial to others who are researching this topic because it thoroughly explains the new requirements that Spirit airlines, and potentially other airlines, have proposed regarding emotional support animals and their allowance onboard an aircraft.

Word Count: 414

O’Haire, Marguerite E., et al. “Social Behaviors Increase in Children with Autism in the Presence of Animals Compared to Toys.” PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, 2013, journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371journal.pone.0057010. Accessed 19 Sept. 2020.

In their article “Social Behaviors Increase in Children with Autism in the Presence of Animals Compared to Toys”, Marguerite E. O’Haire and her colleagues argue that the inclusion of emotional support animals, through the processes of animal assisted therapy (AAT) and “human-animal interaction (HAI)” (pp. 1), may effectively boost socialization skills, communication, positive emotions and positive behaviors in children aged five to thirteen years old with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) based on previous research done on HAI. O’Haire and her colleagues admit that other researchers’ findings may have been limited. In the experiment without the use of a support animal, there was only one study that provided the child with an alternative option to play with, one study that did not include a licensed therapist in the same room when observing the children’s communication efforts with their peers, and none of the studies had additional people to record the children’s behavior, which may have produced a warped outcome of the studies overall, which may be the reason why future studies need to be conducted on this topic. These future studies need to be more productive when observing the children, so they do not make the same mistakes that others have made.

Marguerite E. O’Haire is an Associate Professor of Human-Animal Interaction. She works in the Department of Comparative Pathobiology at Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine. Her primary evidence is the research of other resources on this topic and throughout her article, she constantly points out how these researchers could have improved the results of their research. The type of rhetoric used is a combination of both pathos and logos since O’Haire and her colleagues provide scientific research along with the emotional reactions expressed by the children with autism such as joyful expressions on their faces and laughter. The feelings of isolation and loneliness are dimmed when a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is with a service animal, and they are more social toward adults and friends. Other researchers’ findings seem to have multiple limitations. In the situations where the child was given no animal, there was only one experiment where the child was given a different distraction to play with and multiple situations where the child was presented with no animal and no alternative source, rendering their findings inconclusive. Unlike my other sources, this source actually includes positive results and proof that a therapeutic dog or service dog is beneficial to children with mental disorders when my other sources all said that there was no significant difference between when a child was not with a therapeutic dog and when a child was with a therapeutic dog.

This source is helpful to my research because it provides information regarding children who have mental disorders and how they benefit from animal assisted therapy and service dogs. It also provokes the idea that topics regarding therapeutic animals and ESAs are still in their infancy and future studies need to be done to provide researchers with more information and conclusive results about the health benefits involved with animal-assisted therapy and emotional support animals. Those who are on the autism spectrum may find this source interesting to read since this article revolves around the benefits of animal-assisted therapy specifically on children on the autism spectrum.

Word Count: 524

Stockman, Farah. “‘Reptiles to Insects’: Emotional Support Animals or Just Pets?” New York Times, 19 June 2019, p. A12(L). Gale In Context: Science, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A589627931/SCIC?u=nhmccd_main&sid=SCIC&xid=1f7fa891. Accessed 28 Oct. 2020.

In her article, “’Reptiles to Insects’: Emotional Support Animals or Just Pets?”, Farah Stockman argues that there is “skepticism” around the role of emotional support animals, especially given that there have been cases of a dog hurting a passenger and a squirrel that was brought on by a passenger where all passengers had to deplane, that have added to the growing controversy concerning the actual benefits of emotional support animals. Stockman admits, especially in the case of Myers and Primadonna, that “the snow-white bird has worked wonders for his state of mind” (pp. 3), implying that all emotional support animals may “work wonders” for the minds of those who suffer from anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

This article seems very thorough, accurate, and reliable. Since Stockman is nationally recognized by the Society for Professional Journalists and her article on emotional support animals has numerous real-world situations where the rights of emotional support animals are questioned, this makes her article an ideal source for my research paper. Farah Stockman uses an interview with twenty-six-year-old Vayne Myers as her main source of evidence. Throughout her discussion of Myers, she notes the strong bond between Myers and his emotional support duck, using effective pathos rhetoric to describe just how much Myers was attached to the duck from the moment he laid eyes on him. Stockman’s work was very emotional and moving in comparison to the other authors who have done research on this topic because unlike them, she does not seem to use any scientific evidence and instead uses Myers’ story to tug at the reader’s heart. This is unique to my paper, since it focuses on one person’s struggle to find a way for his emotional support duck to be included in his life so that he could feel happy and loved.

This source is important for my research because it shows just how attached people can be to their emotional support animals. It also shows a little of the controversy about the rights of emotional support animals, including what species of animals are allowed to be emotional support animals. This article also explains the idea that people with mental illnesses should do whatever it takes to make them feel comfortable as long as they are not hurting anyone else. This idea could be valuable to my research because it approves of emotional support animals being used in public.

This source could contribute to the development of my research question because it includes a real-life example of a man and the bond that he shares with his emotional support animal. It also shows why people would disapprove of Myers having the duck living with him and what would not be considered “acceptable” in terms of medical documents, like a note from a therapist or a counselor. The article also provides details about Matthew Diatz’s former situations that he worked in and this gives information about why Diatz wanted to help Myers keep Primadonna in the first place. It also implies that as a society, we need to accept not only emotional support animals, but also people with disabilities and their needs. As Diatz puts it, “mental illness is tough, and anything that makes somebody feel better, why not? As long as you don’t hurt anybody else, what’s the big deal’” (pp. 6)? In contrast to this, one could argue that emotional support animals pose a threat to people’s health and safety because there have been “a number of widely publicized incidents — a dog allegedly mauling a passenger and an emotional support squirrel causing an entire flight to deplane — have added to the anxiety over anxiety-soothing animals” (pp. 5). In addition to this, some emotional support animals could pose a threat to others because some of the most common animal allergens are cats and dogs, and the Americans With Disabilities Act officially recognizes dogs as emotional support animals.

Word Count 569[supanova_question]

emanicaption discussion

S. Civil War was not about preserving slavery, but was instead about preserving state’s rights. This group is by no means limited to the South. Indeed, if you go to rural portions of northern states like New York and Ohio or in border states like Maryland, it is not too hard to find people waving the old Bars [supanova_question]

emanicaption discussion

Writing Assignment Help S. Civil War was not about preserving slavery, but was instead about preserving state’s rights. This group is by no means limited to the South. Indeed, if you go to rural portions of northern states like New York and Ohio or in border states like Maryland, it is not too hard to find people waving the old Bars [supanova_question]

emanicaption discussion

S. Civil War was not about preserving slavery, but was instead about preserving state’s rights. This group is by no means limited to the South. Indeed, if you go to rural portions of northern states like New York and Ohio or in border states like Maryland, it is not too hard to find people waving the old Bars [supanova_question]

emanicaption discussion

S. Civil War was not about preserving slavery, but was instead about preserving state’s rights. This group is by no means limited to the South. Indeed, if you go to rural portions of northern states like New York and Ohio or in border states like Maryland, it is not too hard to find people waving the old Bars [supanova_question]