Bentham’s Principle of Utility Principle of Utility Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s

Bentham’s Principle of Utility

Principle of Utility

Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s Ethics

Mill’s ethical theory Hedonic Utilitarianism, which is a form of consequentialism: The permissibility of actions is determined by examining their outcomes and comparing those outcomes with what would have happened if some other action had been performed.

Mill responds to Kant’s criticism of consequentialist moral theories by saying that Kant confuses act evaluation and agent evaluation. (Kant argued that consequences should not be used in evaluating actions because we have inadequate control over consequences, and our moral obligations extend only so far as our abilities. Instead, Kant examines our motives to determine the permissibility of our actions.) Mill says that the examination of motives is appropriate for agent evaluation, but not act evaluation. Mill also points out that a morally good person could – with the best of motives – perform an impermissible action.

Principle of Utility: An action is permissible if and only if the consequences of that action are at least as good as those of any other action available to the agent.

• Alternative formulation: An action is permissible if and only if there is no other action available to the agent that would have had better consequences. (These two formulations are equivalent.)

• Moral theories that employ the Principle of Utility are called Utilitarian theories.

• Note that, according to the Principle of Utility, an action could have good consequences but still not be permissible (because some other action was available to the agent that would have had better consequences).

• Also, an action with bad consequences could still be permissible (if no other available action had better consequences).

Hedonic Utilitarianism: Mill’s theory begins with the Principle of Utility, and then adds that the consequences that are of importance are happiness and unhappiness.

• Everyone’s happiness is taken into account, and given equal weight.

• There is no time limit on consequences. All the happiness and unhappiness that result from an action must be taken into account, no matter how long it takes for these consequences to arise.

• Mill also says that it is better for happiness to be distributed among many people. The moral goal of our actions, he says, is to create “the greatest happiness for the greatest number.”

• Note that when using this principle it is impossible to determine whether an action is permissible unless one compares the consequences of that action with the consequences of all the other actions the agent could have performed.

Contrast with Jeremy Bentham: Bentham, Mill’s teacher, held a similar moral theory, but said that the consequences we should examine are pleasure and pain. Mill says that by examining happiness and unhappiness he is including a new factor: the intellectual component.

• For Bentham, the only things that could make one pleasure better than another (or one pain worse than another) were its intensity and its duration. Mill adds a new

dimension: the intellectual component. This has the result of making the pleasures and pains of animals count for much less.

Comparison with Satisficing Consequentialism: Mill says that for an action to be permissible it must have the best consequences. Satisficing consequentialism says that to be permissible its consequences have to be good enough.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for more than one permissible action in many situations. Mill, by contrast, implies that there is usually only one permissible action available.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for a distinction between permissible actions and supererogatory actions.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for moral dilemmas (situations in which only two actions are available, and neither is morally permissible).

Act vs. Rule Consequentialism: Act consequentialist theories (e.g., the theories of Bentham and J.S. Mill) evaluate actions on a case-by-case basis. Rule consequentialist theories say that an action is permissible only if it is in accord with the relevant rules. Rules are selected so that following them will

Utilitarianism- J. Bentham’s Felicific Calculus

Felicific calculus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The felicific calculus is an algorithm formulated by utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of pleasure that a specific action is likely to cause. Bentham, an ethicalhedonist, believed the moral rightness or wrongness of an action to be a function of the amount of pleasure or pain that it produced. The felicific calculus could, in principle at least, determine the moral status of any considered act. The algorithm is also known as the utility calculus, the hedonistic calculus and the hedonic calculus.

Intensity: How strong is the pleasure?

Duration: How long will the pleasure last?

Certainty or uncertainty: How likely or unlikely is it that the pleasure will occur?

Propinquity or remoteness: How soon will the pleasure occur?

Fecundity: The probability that the action will be followed by sensations of the same kind.

Purity: The probability that it will not be followed by sensations of the opposite kind.

Extent: How many people will be affected?

Utilitarianism Claims

Utilitarianism: is the ethical doctrine that the moral worth of an action is solely determined by its contribution to overall utility.

It is thus a form of consequentialism, meaning that the morality of an action is determined by its outcome

*the ends justify the means.

*Utility: the good to be maximized

Peter Singer defines it as the satisfaction of preferences.

* an action may be considered right if it produces the greatest amount of net benefit and the least loss/cost of any available alternative action.

* the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgment about that action.

*morally right action is one that produces a good outcome, or consequence.

* the good is whatever brings the greatest happiness to the greatest number of people.

* “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.

* calculate the utility of an action by adding up all of the pleasure produced and subtracting from that any pain that might also be produced by the action.

Utilitarianism approach to morality quantitative and reductionistic

Utilitarianism can be contrasted with deontological ethics – focuses on the action itself rather than its consequences

In general use the term utilitarian often refers to a somewhat narrow economic or pragmatic viewpoint.

List of Contemporary Moral Issues

Euthanasia

Gun Control

Infanticide

Child Labor

Gay Marriage

Capital Punishment

Stem Cells

Genocide

War, Terrorism, and Counterterrorism

Race and Ethnicity

Gender

Transgender using Public Bathrooms

World Hunger and Poverty

Environmental Ethics

Animal Rights

Animal Testing

Sexual Harassment

Abortion (as a result of rape, incest, or mother/baby health at risk)

Drug Legalization

Media/Entertainment

Voluntary Prostitution

Forced Prostitution

Health Care Costs

Education Cost[supanova_question]

Bentham’s Principle of Utility Principle of Utility Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s

Bentham’s Principle of Utility

Principle of Utility

Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s Ethics

Mill’s ethical theory Hedonic Utilitarianism, which is a form of consequentialism: The permissibility of actions is determined by examining their outcomes and comparing those outcomes with what would have happened if some other action had been performed.

Mill responds to Kant’s criticism of consequentialist moral theories by saying that Kant confuses act evaluation and agent evaluation. (Kant argued that consequences should not be used in evaluating actions because we have inadequate control over consequences, and our moral obligations extend only so far as our abilities. Instead, Kant examines our motives to determine the permissibility of our actions.) Mill says that the examination of motives is appropriate for agent evaluation, but not act evaluation. Mill also points out that a morally good person could – with the best of motives – perform an impermissible action.

Principle of Utility: An action is permissible if and only if the consequences of that action are at least as good as those of any other action available to the agent.

• Alternative formulation: An action is permissible if and only if there is no other action available to the agent that would have had better consequences. (These two formulations are equivalent.)

• Moral theories that employ the Principle of Utility are called Utilitarian theories.

• Note that, according to the Principle of Utility, an action could have good consequences but still not be permissible (because some other action was available to the agent that would have had better consequences).

• Also, an action with bad consequences could still be permissible (if no other available action had better consequences).

Hedonic Utilitarianism: Mill’s theory begins with the Principle of Utility, and then adds that the consequences that are of importance are happiness and unhappiness.

• Everyone’s happiness is taken into account, and given equal weight.

• There is no time limit on consequences. All the happiness and unhappiness that result from an action must be taken into account, no matter how long it takes for these consequences to arise.

• Mill also says that it is better for happiness to be distributed among many people. The moral goal of our actions, he says, is to create “the greatest happiness for the greatest number.”

• Note that when using this principle it is impossible to determine whether an action is permissible unless one compares the consequences of that action with the consequences of all the other actions the agent could have performed.

Contrast with Jeremy Bentham: Bentham, Mill’s teacher, held a similar moral theory, but said that the consequences we should examine are pleasure and pain. Mill says that by examining happiness and unhappiness he is including a new factor: the intellectual component.

• For Bentham, the only things that could make one pleasure better than another (or one pain worse than another) were its intensity and its duration. Mill adds a new

dimension: the intellectual component. This has the result of making the pleasures and pains of animals count for much less.

Comparison with Satisficing Consequentialism: Mill says that for an action to be permissible it must have the best consequences. Satisficing consequentialism says that to be permissible its consequences have to be good enough.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for more than one permissible action in many situations. Mill, by contrast, implies that there is usually only one permissible action available.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for a distinction between permissible actions and supererogatory actions.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for moral dilemmas (situations in which only two actions are available, and neither is morally permissible).

Act vs. Rule Consequentialism: Act consequentialist theories (e.g., the theories of Bentham and J.S. Mill) evaluate actions on a case-by-case basis. Rule consequentialist theories say that an action is permissible only if it is in accord with the relevant rules. Rules are selected so that following them will

Utilitarianism- J. Bentham’s Felicific Calculus

Felicific calculus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The felicific calculus is an algorithm formulated by utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of pleasure that a specific action is likely to cause. Bentham, an ethicalhedonist, believed the moral rightness or wrongness of an action to be a function of the amount of pleasure or pain that it produced. The felicific calculus could, in principle at least, determine the moral status of any considered act. The algorithm is also known as the utility calculus, the hedonistic calculus and the hedonic calculus.

Intensity: How strong is the pleasure?

Duration: How long will the pleasure last?

Certainty or uncertainty: How likely or unlikely is it that the pleasure will occur?

Propinquity or remoteness: How soon will the pleasure occur?

Fecundity: The probability that the action will be followed by sensations of the same kind.

Purity: The probability that it will not be followed by sensations of the opposite kind.

Extent: How many people will be affected?

Utilitarianism Claims

Utilitarianism: is the ethical doctrine that the moral worth of an action is solely determined by its contribution to overall utility.

It is thus a form of consequentialism, meaning that the morality of an action is determined by its outcome

*the ends justify the means.

*Utility: the good to be maximized

Peter Singer defines it as the satisfaction of preferences.

* an action may be considered right if it produces the greatest amount of net benefit and the least loss/cost of any available alternative action.

* the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgment about that action.

*morally right action is one that produces a good outcome, or consequence.

* the good is whatever brings the greatest happiness to the greatest number of people.

* “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.

* calculate the utility of an action by adding up all of the pleasure produced and subtracting from that any pain that might also be produced by the action.

Utilitarianism approach to morality quantitative and reductionistic

Utilitarianism can be contrasted with deontological ethics – focuses on the action itself rather than its consequences

In general use the term utilitarian often refers to a somewhat narrow economic or pragmatic viewpoint.

List of Contemporary Moral Issues

Euthanasia

Gun Control

Infanticide

Child Labor

Gay Marriage

Capital Punishment

Stem Cells

Genocide

War, Terrorism, and Counterterrorism

Race and Ethnicity

Gender

Transgender using Public Bathrooms

World Hunger and Poverty

Environmental Ethics

Animal Rights

Animal Testing

Sexual Harassment

Abortion (as a result of rape, incest, or mother/baby health at risk)

Drug Legalization

Media/Entertainment

Voluntary Prostitution

Forced Prostitution

Health Care Costs

Education Cost[supanova_question]

Bentham’s Principle of Utility Principle of Utility Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s

Bentham’s Principle of Utility

Principle of Utility

Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s Ethics

Mill’s ethical theory Hedonic Utilitarianism, which is a form of consequentialism: The permissibility of actions is determined by examining their outcomes and comparing those outcomes with what would have happened if some other action had been performed.

Mill responds to Kant’s criticism of consequentialist moral theories by saying that Kant confuses act evaluation and agent evaluation. (Kant argued that consequences should not be used in evaluating actions because we have inadequate control over consequences, and our moral obligations extend only so far as our abilities. Instead, Kant examines our motives to determine the permissibility of our actions.) Mill says that the examination of motives is appropriate for agent evaluation, but not act evaluation. Mill also points out that a morally good person could – with the best of motives – perform an impermissible action.

Principle of Utility: An action is permissible if and only if the consequences of that action are at least as good as those of any other action available to the agent.

• Alternative formulation: An action is permissible if and only if there is no other action available to the agent that would have had better consequences. (These two formulations are equivalent.)

• Moral theories that employ the Principle of Utility are called Utilitarian theories.

• Note that, according to the Principle of Utility, an action could have good consequences but still not be permissible (because some other action was available to the agent that would have had better consequences).

• Also, an action with bad consequences could still be permissible (if no other available action had better consequences).

Hedonic Utilitarianism: Mill’s theory begins with the Principle of Utility, and then adds that the consequences that are of importance are happiness and unhappiness.

• Everyone’s happiness is taken into account, and given equal weight.

• There is no time limit on consequences. All the happiness and unhappiness that result from an action must be taken into account, no matter how long it takes for these consequences to arise.

• Mill also says that it is better for happiness to be distributed among many people. The moral goal of our actions, he says, is to create “the greatest happiness for the greatest number.”

• Note that when using this principle it is impossible to determine whether an action is permissible unless one compares the consequences of that action with the consequences of all the other actions the agent could have performed.

Contrast with Jeremy Bentham: Bentham, Mill’s teacher, held a similar moral theory, but said that the consequences we should examine are pleasure and pain. Mill says that by examining happiness and unhappiness he is including a new factor: the intellectual component.

• For Bentham, the only things that could make one pleasure better than another (or one pain worse than another) were its intensity and its duration. Mill adds a new

dimension: the intellectual component. This has the result of making the pleasures and pains of animals count for much less.

Comparison with Satisficing Consequentialism: Mill says that for an action to be permissible it must have the best consequences. Satisficing consequentialism says that to be permissible its consequences have to be good enough.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for more than one permissible action in many situations. Mill, by contrast, implies that there is usually only one permissible action available.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for a distinction between permissible actions and supererogatory actions.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for moral dilemmas (situations in which only two actions are available, and neither is morally permissible).

Act vs. Rule Consequentialism: Act consequentialist theories (e.g., the theories of Bentham and J.S. Mill) evaluate actions on a case-by-case basis. Rule consequentialist theories say that an action is permissible only if it is in accord with the relevant rules. Rules are selected so that following them will

Utilitarianism- J. Bentham’s Felicific Calculus

Felicific calculus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The felicific calculus is an algorithm formulated by utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of pleasure that a specific action is likely to cause. Bentham, an ethicalhedonist, believed the moral rightness or wrongness of an action to be a function of the amount of pleasure or pain that it produced. The felicific calculus could, in principle at least, determine the moral status of any considered act. The algorithm is also known as the utility calculus, the hedonistic calculus and the hedonic calculus.

Intensity: How strong is the pleasure?

Duration: How long will the pleasure last?

Certainty or uncertainty: How likely or unlikely is it that the pleasure will occur?

Propinquity or remoteness: How soon will the pleasure occur?

Fecundity: The probability that the action will be followed by sensations of the same kind.

Purity: The probability that it will not be followed by sensations of the opposite kind.

Extent: How many people will be affected?

Utilitarianism Claims

Utilitarianism: is the ethical doctrine that the moral worth of an action is solely determined by its contribution to overall utility.

It is thus a form of consequentialism, meaning that the morality of an action is determined by its outcome

*the ends justify the means.

*Utility: the good to be maximized

Peter Singer defines it as the satisfaction of preferences.

* an action may be considered right if it produces the greatest amount of net benefit and the least loss/cost of any available alternative action.

* the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgment about that action.

*morally right action is one that produces a good outcome, or consequence.

* the good is whatever brings the greatest happiness to the greatest number of people.

* “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.

* calculate the utility of an action by adding up all of the pleasure produced and subtracting from that any pain that might also be produced by the action.

Utilitarianism approach to morality quantitative and reductionistic

Utilitarianism can be contrasted with deontological ethics – focuses on the action itself rather than its consequences

In general use the term utilitarian often refers to a somewhat narrow economic or pragmatic viewpoint.

List of Contemporary Moral Issues

Euthanasia

Gun Control

Infanticide

Child Labor

Gay Marriage

Capital Punishment

Stem Cells

Genocide

War, Terrorism, and Counterterrorism

Race and Ethnicity

Gender

Transgender using Public Bathrooms

World Hunger and Poverty

Environmental Ethics

Animal Rights

Animal Testing

Sexual Harassment

Abortion (as a result of rape, incest, or mother/baby health at risk)

Drug Legalization

Media/Entertainment

Voluntary Prostitution

Forced Prostitution

Health Care Costs

Education Cost[supanova_question]

Bentham’s Principle of Utility Principle of Utility Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s

Writing Assignment Help Bentham’s Principle of Utility

Principle of Utility

Study Guide: John Stuart Mill’s Ethics

Mill’s ethical theory Hedonic Utilitarianism, which is a form of consequentialism: The permissibility of actions is determined by examining their outcomes and comparing those outcomes with what would have happened if some other action had been performed.

Mill responds to Kant’s criticism of consequentialist moral theories by saying that Kant confuses act evaluation and agent evaluation. (Kant argued that consequences should not be used in evaluating actions because we have inadequate control over consequences, and our moral obligations extend only so far as our abilities. Instead, Kant examines our motives to determine the permissibility of our actions.) Mill says that the examination of motives is appropriate for agent evaluation, but not act evaluation. Mill also points out that a morally good person could – with the best of motives – perform an impermissible action.

Principle of Utility: An action is permissible if and only if the consequences of that action are at least as good as those of any other action available to the agent.

• Alternative formulation: An action is permissible if and only if there is no other action available to the agent that would have had better consequences. (These two formulations are equivalent.)

• Moral theories that employ the Principle of Utility are called Utilitarian theories.

• Note that, according to the Principle of Utility, an action could have good consequences but still not be permissible (because some other action was available to the agent that would have had better consequences).

• Also, an action with bad consequences could still be permissible (if no other available action had better consequences).

Hedonic Utilitarianism: Mill’s theory begins with the Principle of Utility, and then adds that the consequences that are of importance are happiness and unhappiness.

• Everyone’s happiness is taken into account, and given equal weight.

• There is no time limit on consequences. All the happiness and unhappiness that result from an action must be taken into account, no matter how long it takes for these consequences to arise.

• Mill also says that it is better for happiness to be distributed among many people. The moral goal of our actions, he says, is to create “the greatest happiness for the greatest number.”

• Note that when using this principle it is impossible to determine whether an action is permissible unless one compares the consequences of that action with the consequences of all the other actions the agent could have performed.

Contrast with Jeremy Bentham: Bentham, Mill’s teacher, held a similar moral theory, but said that the consequences we should examine are pleasure and pain. Mill says that by examining happiness and unhappiness he is including a new factor: the intellectual component.

• For Bentham, the only things that could make one pleasure better than another (or one pain worse than another) were its intensity and its duration. Mill adds a new

dimension: the intellectual component. This has the result of making the pleasures and pains of animals count for much less.

Comparison with Satisficing Consequentialism: Mill says that for an action to be permissible it must have the best consequences. Satisficing consequentialism says that to be permissible its consequences have to be good enough.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for more than one permissible action in many situations. Mill, by contrast, implies that there is usually only one permissible action available.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for a distinction between permissible actions and supererogatory actions.

• Satisficing consequentialism allows for moral dilemmas (situations in which only two actions are available, and neither is morally permissible).

Act vs. Rule Consequentialism: Act consequentialist theories (e.g., the theories of Bentham and J.S. Mill) evaluate actions on a case-by-case basis. Rule consequentialist theories say that an action is permissible only if it is in accord with the relevant rules. Rules are selected so that following them will

Utilitarianism- J. Bentham’s Felicific Calculus

Felicific calculus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The felicific calculus is an algorithm formulated by utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of pleasure that a specific action is likely to cause. Bentham, an ethicalhedonist, believed the moral rightness or wrongness of an action to be a function of the amount of pleasure or pain that it produced. The felicific calculus could, in principle at least, determine the moral status of any considered act. The algorithm is also known as the utility calculus, the hedonistic calculus and the hedonic calculus.

Intensity: How strong is the pleasure?

Duration: How long will the pleasure last?

Certainty or uncertainty: How likely or unlikely is it that the pleasure will occur?

Propinquity or remoteness: How soon will the pleasure occur?

Fecundity: The probability that the action will be followed by sensations of the same kind.

Purity: The probability that it will not be followed by sensations of the opposite kind.

Extent: How many people will be affected?

Utilitarianism Claims

Utilitarianism: is the ethical doctrine that the moral worth of an action is solely determined by its contribution to overall utility.

It is thus a form of consequentialism, meaning that the morality of an action is determined by its outcome

*the ends justify the means.

*Utility: the good to be maximized

Peter Singer defines it as the satisfaction of preferences.

* an action may be considered right if it produces the greatest amount of net benefit and the least loss/cost of any available alternative action.

* the consequences of a particular action form the basis for any valid moral judgment about that action.

*morally right action is one that produces a good outcome, or consequence.

* the good is whatever brings the greatest happiness to the greatest number of people.

* “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.

* calculate the utility of an action by adding up all of the pleasure produced and subtracting from that any pain that might also be produced by the action.

Utilitarianism approach to morality quantitative and reductionistic

Utilitarianism can be contrasted with deontological ethics – focuses on the action itself rather than its consequences

In general use the term utilitarian often refers to a somewhat narrow economic or pragmatic viewpoint.

List of Contemporary Moral Issues

Euthanasia

Gun Control

Infanticide

Child Labor

Gay Marriage

Capital Punishment

Stem Cells

Genocide

War, Terrorism, and Counterterrorism

Race and Ethnicity

Gender

Transgender using Public Bathrooms

World Hunger and Poverty

Environmental Ethics

Animal Rights

Animal Testing

Sexual Harassment

Abortion (as a result of rape, incest, or mother/baby health at risk)

Drug Legalization

Media/Entertainment

Voluntary Prostitution

Forced Prostitution

Health Care Costs

Education Cost [supanova_question]

PART II: Matching Section. Correctly match the 5 related concepts/items in columns

PART II: Matching Section. Correctly match the 5 related concepts/items in columns A and B.

A

B

1. Free trade agreements

A. trade strategy of self-reliance; reject imports and

minimize foreign trade

2. Right to self-defense under international law

B. Allowed as an exception to MFN rule

3. one of the key features of an economic union

C. common external tariff

4. example of internal balancing

D. subsidies

5. example of a non-tariff barrier

E. example of external balancing

6. non-discrimination principle

F. NO MATCH

7. violation of international trade rules like the

MFN

8. US-Japan Security Treaty and alliance

9. autarky

10. second strike capability

PART III: SHORT ANSWERS/MULTIPLE CHOICE

What are regional trade agreements (or economic regionalism)?

Realism argues that even if intensions are benign and defensive, a always occurs between states.

If a state believes another state is about to attack it with military force, it will launch a to destroy the imminent threat: (a) trade war (b) preventive war (c) preemptive war (d) protectionism

If the United States raises tariffs on imports from Bolivia without cause, which rule is the US be violating?

Which of the following trade policies is most likely favored by the economic philosophy or approach called mercantilism? (a) free trade (b) alliances (c) protectionism (d) floating exchange rates

If a country lowers sales taxes for domestically produced goods it may be violating which international trade rule?

One of the Bretton Woods institutions is the: (a) World Economic Forum (b) European Central Bank

Asian Development Bank (d) NATO (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

Actions that make your nuclear arsenals secure and able to survive an attack is: (a) a form of external balancing (b) new Cold War (c) violation of the NPT (d) necessary for stable nuclear deterrence

Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor? (a) Bentley University (b) NATO (c) the

Kurds (d) El Chapo’s Sinaloa Drug Cartel (e) Catholic Charities (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

Which of the following IR actors does Liberalism see as important: (a) WHO (b) Catholic Church

United States (d) Google (e) OPEC (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

In IR, groups of people who share the same culture, language, religion or other commonalities are called a

Which of the following IGOs is part of the Bretton Woods system:

(a) collective security (b) Universal Postal Union (c) World Bank (d) NAFTA (e) WHO

Which of the following types of product is more likely to encounter the most protectionist barriers in trade?

(a) Audi A6 (b) iPhone 6 (c) sugar (d) chemicals (e) petroleum

How would you characterize the balance of trade of a country that imports more goods and services than it exports: (a) Economic sanctions (b) trade deficit (c) protectionism (d) fixed exchange rate

A measure of relative wellbeing in a society much better than per capita income is: (a) peace index

(a) GDP (c) HDI (d) MAD (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

Which of the following is considered one of the BRICS country? (a) Vladimir Putin (b) Canada

(c) Botswana (d) Iran (e) Rwanda (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

Non-intervention in the domestic affairs of other states is a key principle of which IR concept ?

Nuclear weapons have big deterrence value. If a new country acquires nuclear weapons, which of the following condition must it guarantee in order to have stable nuclear deterrence and deter attack?

(a) high HDI (b) survivable arsenal (c) democracy (d) non-tariff barriers (e) military superiority

As forms of economic regionalism, which of the following features do NAFTA and the European Union have in common? (a) collective defense (b) mercantilism (c) monetary union (d) common external tariff

(e) All the answers (f) None of the answers

Which of the following features of a state is the democratic peace theory most interested in: (a) trade balance

(b) HDI (c) type of economy (d) ideology (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

If a world government were to emerge in the international system, which key feature of the system would cease to exist?

How do nuclear-armed states achieve second-strike capability?[supanova_question]

PART II: Matching Section. Correctly match the 5 related concepts/items in columns

PART II: Matching Section. Correctly match the 5 related concepts/items in columns A and B.

A

B

1. Free trade agreements

A. trade strategy of self-reliance; reject imports and

minimize foreign trade

2. Right to self-defense under international law

B. Allowed as an exception to MFN rule

3. one of the key features of an economic union

C. common external tariff

4. example of internal balancing

D. subsidies

5. example of a non-tariff barrier

E. example of external balancing

6. non-discrimination principle

F. NO MATCH

7. violation of international trade rules like the

MFN

8. US-Japan Security Treaty and alliance

9. autarky

10. second strike capability

PART III: SHORT ANSWERS/MULTIPLE CHOICE

What are regional trade agreements (or economic regionalism)?

Realism argues that even if intensions are benign and defensive, a always occurs between states.

If a state believes another state is about to attack it with military force, it will launch a to destroy the imminent threat: (a) trade war (b) preventive war (c) preemptive war (d) protectionism

If the United States raises tariffs on imports from Bolivia without cause, which rule is the US be violating?

Which of the following trade policies is most likely favored by the economic philosophy or approach called mercantilism? (a) free trade (b) alliances (c) protectionism (d) floating exchange rates

If a country lowers sales taxes for domestically produced goods it may be violating which international trade rule?

One of the Bretton Woods institutions is the: (a) World Economic Forum (b) European Central Bank

Asian Development Bank (d) NATO (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

Actions that make your nuclear arsenals secure and able to survive an attack is: (a) a form of external balancing (b) new Cold War (c) violation of the NPT (d) necessary for stable nuclear deterrence

Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor? (a) Bentley University (b) NATO (c) the

Kurds (d) El Chapo’s Sinaloa Drug Cartel (e) Catholic Charities (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

Which of the following IR actors does Liberalism see as important: (a) WHO (b) Catholic Church

United States (d) Google (e) OPEC (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

In IR, groups of people who share the same culture, language, religion or other commonalities are called a

Which of the following IGOs is part of the Bretton Woods system:

(a) collective security (b) Universal Postal Union (c) World Bank (d) NAFTA (e) WHO

Which of the following types of product is more likely to encounter the most protectionist barriers in trade?

(a) Audi A6 (b) iPhone 6 (c) sugar (d) chemicals (e) petroleum

How would you characterize the balance of trade of a country that imports more goods and services than it exports: (a) Economic sanctions (b) trade deficit (c) protectionism (d) fixed exchange rate

A measure of relative wellbeing in a society much better than per capita income is: (a) peace index

(a) GDP (c) HDI (d) MAD (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

Which of the following is considered one of the BRICS country? (a) Vladimir Putin (b) Canada

(c) Botswana (d) Iran (e) Rwanda (f) all the answers (g) none of the answers

Non-intervention in the domestic affairs of other states is a key principle of which IR concept ?

Nuclear weapons have big deterrence value. If a new country acquires nuclear weapons, which of the following condition must it guarantee in order to have stable nuclear deterrence and deter attack?

(a) high HDI (b) survivable arsenal (c) democracy (d) non-tariff barriers (e) military superiority

As forms of economic regionalism, which of the following features do NAFTA and the European Union have in common? (a) collective defense (b) mercantilism (c) monetary union (d) common external tariff

(e) All the answers (f) None of the answers

Which of the following features of a state is the democratic peace theory most interested in: (a) trade balance

(b) HDI (c) type of economy (d) ideology (e) all the answers (f) none of the answers

If a world government were to emerge in the international system, which key feature of the system would cease to exist?

How do nuclear-armed states achieve second-strike capability?[supanova_question]