A. Directions Step 1: Pick a Topic Select a community group Essay

A. Directions
Step 1: Pick a Topic
Select a community group to study. Some examples of community groups you might explore include:

An activity-based group like a book club, a soccer team, or a community choir
A religious or ideological community such as a church congregation or a local political party
A community organization like a Parent Teacher Association (PTA), a neighborhood association, or the volunteer committee at a local soup kitchen
An identity-based organization such as a social club for veterans or a fraternal type organization
It should be a group in which membership is voluntary and recreational. Avoid:

Families
Workplaces
Ethnic or racial categories
Friend groups
You might wish to choose a group that you are a part of, or you might not. You can use your personal experience with the group to form the basis of your research question. Or you can ask members of the group about their experiences, which will help you develop your research question.

In the template, write a paragraph (approximately 6-8 sentences) describing the community group you have chosen. In particular, be sure to answer the following questions:

What is the community group?
What are the attributes or characteristics of this community group? (e.g. What activities does this group do together? What element of the members’ interests or identities brings them together? How is membership in the group defined, if at all?)
What kind of experience with or access to this community group do you have?
Step 2: Ask a Question
Next, you will formulate a question related to this group, and to topics related to diversity and/or collaboration. You might think about diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, socioeconomic status, or along multiple intersecting identities. Be sure to use what you learned in Unit 1 about the ways sociologists ask questions.

Examples:

What are the challenges of a mom’s community organization in appealing to moms with children of different ages?
How does a group of car enthusiasts reach out to the surrounding community to get support for their events?
How has the Boy Scouts accepting girls impacted their mission and programs?
Do gender segregated sports teams for kids help maintain traditional gender roles?
In the template, write the question you have formulated for your study. Be sure to identify the Independent and Dependent variables and identify them correctly. (HINT: Refer back to Lesson 1.3.3: Asking Questions and Lesson 1.3.5: Formulating a Hypothesis for help.)

Step 3: Prepare a Bibliography
Finally, you will begin developing a bibliography for a review of the existing literature that relates to your question. Before conducting a full literature review, a sociologist will build a bibliography, or a list of potential sources that they will read and study in greater depth in the review.

Collect 4-6 articles, books, or other resources that relate to your question and list them in your template. You don’t have to look into these materials in depth right now! You’ll review this literature more closely in a later Touchstone, and you will also be exposed to additional relevant research and frameworks in Unit 3. You’ll also be able to add to or amend your bibliography before your Touchstone in Unit 3.

Attributes of good readings for your literature review:

They are academic, scholarly works about research findings or they are reliable journalistic reporting based on scientifically credible and reliable data.
They should have been published in the last 10 years—unless they are a landmark work on the topic and provide important background or as a comparison.
They look at different sides of the argument and a variety of perspectives.
Where to find readings: More than likely you will use a major search engine like Google. Start your search by asking the question you want to answer and identifying key search terms to generate relevant results. You can limit your Google search to works that have been published in the last 10 years. You can also use a search engine like Google Scholar that specifically searches scholarly literature. However, keep in mind that much of this literature may have limited or paid access. Another good place to search is in a public or university library catalog or database. Whichever way you choose to search, make sure that you are selecting credible sources.

What makes a source credible? Credible sources are written by authors who are well known in their field. They are based on scientific data—not opinions or with biased observations. Sources should be from reliable outlets, like major publishers, universities, think tanks, and credentialed current practitioners. (HINT: Refer back to Lesson 1.3.4: Researching Existing Sources for more guidance.)

How to format sources in your bibliography: Sociologists use American Psychological Association (APA) format for their research. However, you will use a more simplified method to format sources for your bibliography. You will include five key elements for each source, with each element separated by a period:

Author’s name(s)
Publication date
Title of the source
Page numbers (if applicable)
Source’s location for web-based texts (URL)
EXAMPLE Alireza Behtoui. 2015. Beyond social ties: The impact of social capital on labour market outcomes for young Swedish people. p. 711-724. journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1440783315581217[supanova_question]

A. Directions Step 1: Pick a Topic Select a community group to study. Some examples of community groups you Essay

A. Directions
Step 1: Pick a Topic
Select a community group to study. Some examples of community groups you might explore include:

An activity-based group like a book club, a soccer team, or a community choir
A religious or ideological community such as a church congregation or a local political party
A community organization like a Parent Teacher Association (PTA), a neighborhood association, or the volunteer committee at a local soup kitchen
An identity-based organization such as a social club for veterans or a fraternal type organization
It should be a group in which membership is voluntary and recreational. Avoid:

Families
Workplaces
Ethnic or racial categories
Friend groups
You might wish to choose a group that you are a part of, or you might not. You can use your personal experience with the group to form the basis of your research question. Or you can ask members of the group about their experiences, which will help you develop your research question.

In the template, write a paragraph (approximately 6-8 sentences) describing the community group you have chosen. In particular, be sure to answer the following questions:

What is the community group?
What are the attributes or characteristics of this community group? (e.g. What activities does this group do together? What element of the members’ interests or identities brings them together? How is membership in the group defined, if at all?)
What kind of experience with or access to this community group do you have?
Step 2: Ask a Question
Next, you will formulate a question related to this group, and to topics related to diversity and/or collaboration. You might think about diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, socioeconomic status, or along multiple intersecting identities. Be sure to use what you learned in Unit 1 about the ways sociologists ask questions.

Examples:

What are the challenges of a mom’s community organization in appealing to moms with children of different ages?
How does a group of car enthusiasts reach out to the surrounding community to get support for their events?
How has the Boy Scouts accepting girls impacted their mission and programs?
Do gender segregated sports teams for kids help maintain traditional gender roles?
In the template, write the question you have formulated for your study. Be sure to identify the Independent and Dependent variables and identify them correctly. (HINT: Refer back to Lesson 1.3.3: Asking Questions and Lesson 1.3.5: Formulating a Hypothesis for help.)

Step 3: Prepare a Bibliography
Finally, you will begin developing a bibliography for a review of the existing literature that relates to your question. Before conducting a full literature review, a sociologist will build a bibliography, or a list of potential sources that they will read and study in greater depth in the review.

Collect 4-6 articles, books, or other resources that relate to your question and list them in your template. You don’t have to look into these materials in depth right now! You’ll review this literature more closely in a later Touchstone, and you will also be exposed to additional relevant research and frameworks in Unit 3. You’ll also be able to add to or amend your bibliography before your Touchstone in Unit 3.

Attributes of good readings for your literature review:

They are academic, scholarly works about research findings or they are reliable journalistic reporting based on scientifically credible and reliable data.
They should have been published in the last 10 years—unless they are a landmark work on the topic and provide important background or as a comparison.
They look at different sides of the argument and a variety of perspectives.
Where to find readings: More than likely you will use a major search engine like Google. Start your search by asking the question you want to answer and identifying key search terms to generate relevant results. You can limit your Google search to works that have been published in the last 10 years. You can also use a search engine like Google Scholar that specifically searches scholarly literature. However, keep in mind that much of this literature may have limited or paid access. Another good place to search is in a public or university library catalog or database. Whichever way you choose to search, make sure that you are selecting credible sources.

What makes a source credible? Credible sources are written by authors who are well known in their field. They are based on scientific data—not opinions or with biased observations. Sources should be from reliable outlets, like major publishers, universities, think tanks, and credentialed current practitioners. (HINT: Refer back to Lesson 1.3.4: Researching Existing Sources for more guidance.)

How to format sources in your bibliography: Sociologists use American Psychological Association (APA) format for their research. However, you will use a more simplified method to format sources for your bibliography. You will include five key elements for each source, with each element separated by a period:

Author’s name(s)
Publication date
Title of the source
Page numbers (if applicable)
Source’s location for web-based texts (URL)
EXAMPLE Alireza Behtoui. 2015. Beyond social ties: The impact of social capital on labour market outcomes for young Swedish people. p. 711-724. journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1440783315581217[supanova_question]

socio 120

Sociology Assignment Help Paper 2 is due Sunday, November 28, 2021 by 11:59pm. This date is later than the one in the syllabus.Theoretical Perspectives on Family
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gives a little more detail about the functionalist and conflict theories on family. Read it before continuing. Be aware that some of this information is new and not presented in the textbook, although this document was already available in the Family lesson. Your paper should be based on the theories as discussed in Theoretical Perspectives on Family. This is a comparison and contrast essay between functionalist and conflict views on family as a social institution. The following video may help you structure your paper. You can click “Tutoring” in the left menu to get help from Cuyamaca’s tutoring center.
This assignment will give you another opportunity to illustrate your knowledge and understanding of the course concept of family and how it relates to the real world, especially your personal world. When writing the paper think of how you would explain or teach these concepts to someone who has never heard of them and/or how you would present them in front of a class like this one. How would you describe the concepts to them? What examples would you use to illustrate the concepts. Read the guidelines below for how to approach this activity.
Review the functionalist perspectives on family from Theoretical Perspectives of Family
Actions
.Define/describe the four key functions of family.
Apply and discuss the four key functions to your family of orientation (the family you grew up in) or family of procreation (your spouse and/or children), and
give examples from your family to illustrate the functions.
Define and/describe the Conflict theory on family and apply it to your family.
Finally, compare and contrast the theories and discuss which theory, functionalism or conflict theory, is better for explaining the purpose and role of family in society and why.
FormatThis paper should be about 750-1300 word or about 3 to 5 double spaced typed pages. You should be able to prepare your paper in your word processor and then copy it into the text box or upload a Word file. Treat this as a formal paper. Use proper grammar, and logical, readable organizational structure (see attached essay structure example file) for an example of good organizational structure). Refrain from using contractions (don’t, can’t, etc). The format should be paragraphs as opposed to lists.How the Paper will be graded:
structure (includes organization of information, spelling and grammar, etc. 2 points)
Description of functionalist theory terms (2 points)
Application of functionalist theory terms to your family (4 points)
Application of conflict theory (give a description of the conflict theory on family and apply the theory to your family) (4 points)
Compare and Contrast the theories, and discuss which you think is a more accurate theory for explaining the purpose and role of family in society and why based on the readings. (8 points)
See the rubric for the grading breakdown.
It is not necessary to use references besides our text book and Theoretical Perspectives of FamilyActions
in this paper, but if you choose to use other references, make sure that they are cited properly in MLA format. Be sure to cite the text book, as everyone should be using it as a starting reference. Also, references like Wikipedia (encyclopedias of any kind) and dictionary.com (dictionaries of any kind) are not acceptable references for a scholarly college level paper. Do not use them as references in your paper.RubricPaper 1 Rubric
Paper 1 Rubric
CriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomePaper follows formal structure, is well organized, is proofread and corrected, does not contain contractions or other grammatical errors.
2 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFour key functions of family have been noted and defined.
2 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeFour key functions have been correctly applied to family of orientation or family of procreation.
4 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeConflict perspective on family is described in detail.
2 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeConflict perspective has been applied to family of orientation or procreation.
2 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeComparison and contrast of the two theories, discussion of which is best and why based on comparison and contrast, and related materials.
8 pts
Total Points: 20

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1. First, read C. Wright Mills’ The Promise of Sociology (provided

1. First, read C. Wright Mills’ The Promise of Sociology (provided on Eagle under “Files” and also in the Week 7 Module)
2.In your own words, describe what the sociological imagination is.
3. Considering your own biography, which social institutions (family, education, political, economic and religion) played an important role in where and who you are today? Provide at least two specific examples. Try to frame your answer in a historical context in relation to your own biography.
4.Conclude by considering and stating the two most important personal decisions that you will likely face in the next 10 years and what “public issues” will play a role in influencing those decisions.[supanova_question]